Confluence and Breaking the Sound Barrier.

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Time seems to be moving very quickly on the Llif/Flow project for Pontio Synthesis.  There was a confluence in the barn on a beautiful sunny Sunday afternoon, when Jonathan Malarkey, Lindsey Colbourne and I were joined by Rhys Trimble, Katherine Betteridge, David Hopewell and, in spirit, Sioned Eleri Roberts. Lindsey had been working on musical runs, and after coffee, cake and discussion of the physics of flow, we moved inside to play. It was both fascinating and a privilege to watch the magic of improvised sound and poetry collaboration happening before our eyes. A sound becomes a note, a beat becomes a rhythm, the marbles and words weave and bounce; sometimes flowing smoothly like the waves in Jonathan’s lab, sometimes bubbling and clattering in chaos like turbulent flow over rocky bed.

 

The afternoon ended with more cake and conversation, as well as a wish list of sound tech to take to our next meeting with Pontio, which was imminent. In fact the following week was intense with marbling. An afternoon spent playing and experimenting on the slopes by Y Caban, Pontio, and a fantastic tech meeting (you really don’t expect to hear “yes” so many times in any one meeting) are both pointing to us being able to do exactly what we wanted to do!!

(photos by Lindsey Colbourne)

At the end of the week, Lindsey, Jonathan and I were invited to the “garden shed” workshop of Iolo Price, a member of Pontio staff, and also a fantastic glass craftsman. He generously showed us the whole magical process of making a handmade marble. The confluence is getting bigger, as Iolo is now working on Pontio marbles for the event.

 

We are definitely moving into the next phase of the project now, away from exploring and experimenting and into the construction and definition process. As I have been working in the studio, I have been thinking about collaboration and how it works. How do you make something that is coherent as a whole, but contains elements of each individual involved? I originally decided that I wanted to work in collaboration rather than making work alone because I found I was having a really hard time finishing work, and was getting lonely and defeatist, but I wasn’t really sure how to collaborate as part of my practice.  I began going on walks with Rhys Trimble, as we were both interested in walking as art, and in the practice of making small interventions in the landscape. We had a couple of great walks, one where we were joined by tiny little horses in an abandoned quarry, another where we built a little cottage out of slate. They were interesting walks, and could still be the start of something, but we didn’t so much collaborate as just share a space, a journey and an intent to create “art”.

Working with Lindsey has been amazing, as we have a shared vision and different skills,as well as the fact that we work well together personally.. My initial fears of losing my voice, or being the lesser half, have been overridden by just working through them and creating together. The beauty of marble runs in they are so compulsive, there’s no room in my head for nagging doubts.

Now we are adding Jonathan to the mix, and not only collaborating between artists, but across disciplines. I think at first I expected that Jonathan would tell us about flow, and Lindsey and I would make runs based on his knowledge, and I wondered what he would get from that. The way it has worked out is so much better. The knowledge is not a one way street, and from the very first meeting, ideas have bounced back and forth until they have become our ideas, and the individual origin has all but disappeared. Although, practically, construction is being done alone in studios and on kitchen tables, there is not one element that hasn’t been created through joint exploration, discussion and agreement. The approach and processes across the disciplines of science and art also seem to be in harmony, as, when you get back to basics, both start with curiosity. I have also realised that, as an artist may look out at a feature of the world and wonder how to represent it in the studio, so the scientist will wonder how to recreate it in their lab. Both are hoping to learn something more about what they are seeing.

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